Trending
MOST READ
8 Cultural Gems on the North Side

8 Cultural Gems on the North Side

City Guide 2014: “Outside the Loop” is used as a pejorative by Downtown-centric cool kids, but oases of culture can be found in the sprawling suburbs of the North Side.... By Dan R. Goddard 2/24/2014
Best Happy Hour

Best Happy Hour

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013
Beaches Be Trippin\': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Beaches Be Trippin': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Arts & Culture: Let’s face it, most of us Lone Stars view the Texas coast as a poor man’s Waikiki. Hell, maybe just a poor man’s Panama Beach — only to be used... By Callie Enlow 7/10/2013
4 Downtown Dive Bars to Embarrass Yourself In

4 Downtown Dive Bars to Embarrass Yourself In

City Guide 2014: In the last few years, San Antonio has made great strides when it comes to its mixology doings. Many good (and some great!) cocktail bars have been springing... By Tim Hennessey 2/24/2014
Chris Pérez, Selena’s Husband, Faces His Past and Looks Forward, Musically

Chris Pérez, Selena’s Husband, Faces His Past and Looks Forward, Musically

Music: Chris Pérez never saw it coming. “All I ever wanted to do was play guitar,” he told the Current. “I never thought I’d be the subject of an interview... By Enrique Lopetegui 8/28/2013
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

Screens & Tech

Freud and Jung go toe-to-toe in A Dangerous Method

Photo: Courtesy photo, License: N/A

Courtesy photo

Before psychiatry had rules: Jung (Michael Fassbender) with “patient” Spielrein (Keira Knightley) in A Dangerous Method.


Hampton's script sings as often as it's stilted, and the top-flight cast imbues these corseted and stiff-collared historical figures with red-blooded life. Indeed, what makes A Dangerous Method most compelling is its exploration of the messy contradictions of the people who set themselves the task of bringing scientific rigor to understanding the subconscious. Knightley's character enters screaming, committing to the kind of conspicuous, tic-ing "insanity" that wins Oscar nominations though not Oscars (see also: Brad Pitt in Twelve Monkeys). Yet over the course of the film, Spielrein's intelligence and passion shine through convincingly. Likewise, Fassbender, protagonist and de facto straight man to two more colorful characters, contrasts Jung's ramrod uprightness with the heedless urges welling under his shirtfront, believably navigating the shoals of fidelity and transgression, suppression and expression in each key relationship. And then there's Mortensen's Freud, a courtly eminence whose radical theoretical leap about the basis of psychological unrest in sexual problems contrasts with his utter rigidity to considering any other option; who dismisses Gross as an addict while puffing his ever-present cigar; who probes the subconscious but at first urges Spielrein to "forget and suppress" her feelings for Jung; who purports that all people are fueled by the same drives and desires but lets differences in religion and class stoke his resentment of Jung. It's the opportunity to get an unbidden glimpse inside these heads that makes all the talk worthwhile. •

★★★ 1/2 (out of 5 stars)
A Dangerous Method
Dir. David Cronenberg; writ. Christopher Hampton, John Kerr; feat. Michael Fassbender, Keira Knightley, Viggo Mortensen. (R)

We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus