Trending
MOST READ
Festival and Parade Planner

Festival and Parade Planner

City Guide 2014: If you’re new to San Antonio, you need to know that one thing we do extremely well is party. Here’s a list of some of our biggest and best parades and festivals so you... By Katie Bosworth 2/24/2014
Beaches Be Trippin\': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Beaches Be Trippin': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Arts & Culture: Let’s face it, most of us Lone Stars view the Texas coast as a poor man’s Waikiki. Hell, maybe just a poor man’s Panama Beach — only to be used... By Callie Enlow 7/10/2013

Best Locally Crafted Clothing

Shopping: Critic's Pick: 4/23/2014
Best-Dressed Woman

Best-Dressed Woman

People: Critic's Pick: 4/23/2014
Chris Pérez, Selena’s Husband, Faces His Past and Looks Forward, Musically

Chris Pérez, Selena’s Husband, Faces His Past and Looks Forward, Musically

Music: Chris Pérez never saw it coming. “All I ever wanted to do was play guitar,” he told the Current. “I never thought I’d be the subject of an interview... By Enrique Lopetegui 8/28/2013
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

Screens & Tech

'The Queen of Versailles': How David Siegel ruined the world and then got screwed himself

Photo: Courtesy photo, License: N/A

Courtesy photo

Watch the throne: David and Jaqueline Siegel.


Lauren Greenfield won two documentary directorial awards at Sundance this year for her fascinating portrayal of David and Jaqueline Siegel, billionaires building the biggest (or second biggest, depending on whom you ask) house in America: a 90,000-square foot Versailles-inspired palace in Orlando. The director gained incredible access to their regular day-to-day life in their smaller home (only 26,000-square feet), and the Siegels seemed happy and on top of the world.

Then, everything crashed, starting with the market. In 2008, the real estate bubble burst and Siegel (owner of time-share giant Westgate Resorts) had to lay off thousands of employees and construction of the dream house stopped. Poor Siegels: forced to now travel on commercial airlines ("What are all those people doing on our plane?" asks one of the Siegel's eight kids; "What's the name of my driver?" Jaqueline asks the clueless rent-a-car clerk at the airport).

Early in the movie, D. Siegel brags about having "personally" elected George W. Bush to office, but doesn't give any details because he suspects some of his methods "may not necessarily have been legal." But as the movie goes on, his confident demeanor turned to depression. And, just before the movie opened in Sundance, he sued the filmmakers (and Sundance) not for the movie itself, but for the way it was described in press materials ("their time-share empire collapses and their house is foreclosed"). Sundance complied and changed the description to "their time-share empire falters due to the economic crisis" and kept out any mention of "foreclosure" in relation to the Orlando house. But the damage was done, according to the Siegels.

In the lawsuit (for which he wanted $75,000 from Sundance and the same amount from Greenfield and her husband/producer Frank Evers), Siegel described the movie as "more fictional than real" and "a staged theatrical production, albeit using nonprofessionals [the Siegels themselves] in the starring roles." Moreover: "We didn't hit bottom," D. Siegel told the New York Times in June. "We just flattened out." To add weirdness to the story: Jaqueline Siegel, according to Greenfield, has been supportive of the film and has attended several festivals with her.

To be fair, Greenfield is not out to destroy the Siegels — she just lets them talk and shows their surroundings; there's no narration here, and plenty of cinéma vérité humor. The couple's cheesy taste for decoration reminded me of Woody Allen and Tracey Ullman in Small Time Crooks, and their fondness for having stuffed former pets on the piano is pretty much the worst I have to say about them. They seem to treat everyone with respect, they're likable, and if Jaqueline's idea of "cutting down" on Christmas shopping is buying carts and carts filled with useless stuff at Walmart, that's up to her. It's a rarely seen inside look at a rags-to-riches-to-rags version of the American Dream — or, rather, the reality of how people at the tip-top always land on their feet.

Recently in Screens & Tech
We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus