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Festival and Parade Planner

Festival and Parade Planner

City Guide 2014: If you’re new to San Antonio, you need to know that one thing we do extremely well is party. Here’s a list of some of our biggest and best parades and festivals so you... By Katie Bosworth 2/24/2014
Beaches Be Trippin\': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Beaches Be Trippin': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Arts & Culture: Let’s face it, most of us Lone Stars view the Texas coast as a poor man’s Waikiki. Hell, maybe just a poor man’s Panama Beach — only to be used... By Callie Enlow 7/10/2013

Best Locally Crafted Clothing

Shopping: Critic's Pick: 4/23/2014
Best-Dressed Woman

Best-Dressed Woman

People: Critic's Pick: 4/23/2014
Chris Pérez, Selena’s Husband, Faces His Past and Looks Forward, Musically

Chris Pérez, Selena’s Husband, Faces His Past and Looks Forward, Musically

Music: Chris Pérez never saw it coming. “All I ever wanted to do was play guitar,” he told the Current. “I never thought I’d be the subject of an interview... By Enrique Lopetegui 8/28/2013
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Primal Screen

'Game of Thrones' drama nearly sunk by rampant sadism

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Indeed, the scientists are becoming quite confused about what’s going on around them. “I’m feeling slightly insane,” says Dr. Blake (Salli Richardson-Whitfield), “but otherwise peachy.”

That insane-yet-peachy feeling — also experienced by viewers — is one of Eureka’s greatest accomplishments.

Richard Hammond’s Crash Course (9pm Mon, BBC America)

I adore the British version of gearhead reality series. The hosts are witty and urbane — words that don’t usually apply to the American TV gearhead. (See: James, Jesse.)

Take Richard Hammond, who branches out from the amusing Top Gear with the new Crash Course. Here, Hammond travels the U.S. to master our most dangerous machines. This week he signs on with an Oregon logging operation, which teaches him to operate three tree-processing contraptions with deadly moving parts. Hammond approaches the task with self-deprecating humor, offering a stream of wry analogies. “This is like putting a knife in a cutlery drawer!” he says while loading a newly cut tree onto a massive stack.

I suspect it’s the first time the word “cutlery” has ever been used in an Oregon logging camp.

The L.A. Complex (8pm Tue, CW)

In this new drama, budding comedians, dancers, musicians, and actors live and love in a low-rent apartment complex while pursuing their Hollywood dreams. They’re tempted by drugs, sex, and selling out as deafening music throbs on the soundtrack.

Unfortunately, it’s not deafening enough to completely drown out the dialogue. Here’s an example, delivered with a straight face by one of the budding actors: “You can give everything you have here and it might not be enough!”

The only way a premise this clichéd could work is if 1) the execution is irresistibly ironic, 2) the actors are irresistibly talented, or 3) the actors are irresistibly good looking.

Forget about #1 and #2. I might tune in again for #3, but only if the music gets a bit louder.

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