Trending
MOST READ
\'Most Naked Woman\' Set to Shimmy at San Antonio Burlesque Festival

'Most Naked Woman' Set to Shimmy at San Antonio Burlesque Festival

Food & Drink: The answer came unanimously without prompting or hesitation, as if sent straight from the sexually liberated goddess of... By Melanie Robinson 7/30/2014
Beaches Be Trippin\': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Beaches Be Trippin': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Arts & Culture: Let’s face it, most of us Lone Stars view the Texas coast as a poor man’s Waikiki. Hell, maybe just a poor man’s Panama Beach — only to be used... By Callie Enlow 7/10/2013
Pub: Stay Golden Social House

Pub: Stay Golden Social House

Flavor 2014: Puro meets Pearl-adjacent at this laidback joint that packs a punch with seriously delicious cocktails... 7/29/2014
Profiles in Cosplay from Ivy Doomkitty to Dog Groomers

Profiles in Cosplay from Ivy Doomkitty to Dog Groomers

Arts & Culture: Wizard World Comic Con graces San Antonio for the first time ever. The traveling pop-culture mega fest brings together comic... By Kyla Mora 7/30/2014
Chicken with a Cult Following at Pollos Asados

Chicken with a Cult Following at Pollos Asados

Food & Drink: It’s late on a Sunday morning, and the crowd that will soon fill Pollos Asados is just beginning to dribble in. Outside, the smoke from... By Ron Bechtol 7/30/2014
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

The QueQue

The QueQue: Science fair: SA teacher petitions the TCEQ, Despite headlines, fracking not out of the woods yet

Photo: , License: N/A


A U.S. Department of Energy subcommittee released its own report a day after Grout’s announcement saying companies aren’t doing enough to cut pollution and contamination risks.

 

Criminalizing homelessness downtown advances

A bolstered “aggressive panhandling” ordinance is destined for a speedy approval at Council this Thursday, expanding a radius of no-fly zones around ATMs, bus stops, and busses from 25 to 50 feet, while also adding to the list restaurants, outdoor patio and dining areas, public parking garages and pay stations, parking meters and converted “donation station” meters collecting change for Haven for Hope. The City’s Public Safety Committee took up the item Tuesday after it stalled in Council earlier this month when downtown’s District 1 Councilman Diego Bernal, a former civil rights attorney, attempted to change the panhandling language already written into city code which prohibits people from asking for cash or “another thing of value.” The language, he feared, was overly broad, possibly criminalizing behavior like asking for food, a cigarette, clothing, blankets, or maybe even a job. With noticeable ire from Police Chief Bill McManus and several other council members, the change was quickly dismissed, and the ordinance sent back to the Public Safety Committee, of which Bernal is not a member.

Tuesday’s short exchange seemed nothing more than procedural — especially given the head-spinning scheduling trick (before Tuesday’s committee meeting, the posted November 17 Council agenda featured the ordinance, referencing the committee meeting that had yet to even occur). Many of the same pro-ordinance voices — Marco Barros, CEO of the San Antonio Area Tourism Council and Olga Kucerak, a downtown resident who says she’s been hassled and threatened by downtown panhandlers — spoke up again Tuesday, asking officials to push through the policy as originally written. (QueQue kept scanning the room for Occupy San Antonio, to no avail.) Bernal promised to support whatever changes the committee made, which were none, on the caveat that the city review the policy in six months. And a contrite Bernal pledged this would be the last time Council had to put up with his concerns over the matter.

The stricter ordinance comes on the heels of the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty’s report “Criminalizing Crisis”: an analysis of local policies in over 200 major U.S. cities that reveal a “startling trend toward criminalizing basic acts necessary for homeless persons’ survival, including eating and sleeping in public,” the group says. Since its 2009 report, the center noted a 7 percent increase in measures targeting begging or panhandling, a 7 percent increase in measures against sleeping outside, and a 10 percent increase in policies against loitering.

It’s bad enough that the banksters sent the world’s economy teetering in the first place, but now those most damaged by the system will find themselves doubly bruised by their neighbors in city government. •

We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus