Trending
MOST READ
‘Walking the Camino’ Explores a Treacherous Trek Through Spain

‘Walking the Camino’ Explores a Treacherous Trek Through Spain

Screens: In the Middle Ages, pilgrims walked the 500-mile El Camino de Santiago de Compostela as a pilgrimage to the tomb of Apostle St. James. It was an... By Stephen James Ross 10/22/2014
Chris Pérez, Selena’s Husband, Faces His Past and Looks Forward, Musically

Chris Pérez, Selena’s Husband, Faces His Past and Looks Forward, Musically

Music: Chris Pérez never saw it coming. “All I ever wanted to do was play guitar,” he told the Current. “I never thought I’d be the subject of an interview... By Enrique Lopetegui 8/28/2013
SAPD Issues Thousands of Tickets for Homelessness

SAPD Issues Thousands of Tickets for Homelessness

News: Data and records obtained by the Current show that between January 1, 2013, and early October of this year the... By Alexa Garcia-Ditta and Elaine Wolff 10/22/2014
Chris Perez, husband of slain Tejana icon Selena, tells of romance, suffering

Chris Perez, husband of slain Tejana icon Selena, tells of romance, suffering

Arts & Culture: In one of the final chapters of his book To Selena, With Love (out March 6), Selena's widower Chris Perez mentions that Abraham Quintanilla, his former father-in-law, once... By Enrique Lopetegui 3/7/2012
5 Awesome Ways to Survive on Ramen

5 Awesome Ways to Survive on Ramen

College Guide 2013: Nearly every college student has lived off of ramen noodles at one point or another. What a lot of them didn’t know was that the classic just-add-water... By Mary Caithn Scott 8/20/2013
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

2011 Year in Review

Recall: Texas vs EPA

Photo: , License: N/A



Related stories


As 2011 dawned, state leaders were openly refusing to abide by new nationwide greenhouse gas emissions standards. While the Environmental Protection Agency took over the process of permitting at new power plants, refineries, and other large industrial facilities, industry reps and many a GOP lawmaker decried the EPA's so-called "war on Texas." Attorney General Greg Abbott took the fight to the courts, while the Perry-appointed commissioners of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality opted instead to thumb their nose at the EPA, eventually approving the building of Corpus Christi-area petroleum-coke-burning Las Brisas power plant in clear defiance of the federal agency. If you ask Gov. Rick Perry or the state's other GOP lawmakers, they're likely to tell you the EPA has been an irresponsible, heavy handed, job-killing regulatory machine. "There's, I think, some unfortunate rhetoric that comes from the head of some of the agencies in the state of Texas and by people in the governor's office," Region 6 EPA administrator Al Armendariz told the Current last month. "It would be great if they would tone down the rhetoric."

Not likely to happen.

This month, the EPA rolled out rules to reduce the release of mercury and other toxic emissions, rules that were first requested by Congress more than 20 years ago. According to the EPA, the new rule will prevent 11,000 deaths a year. And with Texas holding the honor of being the nation's top mercury polluter, the state's coal-fired power plants here spewed 16.9 percent of the total U.S. mercury air emissions in 2010, it's no wonder some are a little touchy. A Perry spokesperson told the Associated Press that the new regulations were just "a continuation of the Obama Administration's assault on traditional American energy sources and the good American jobs they support."

Round two, 2012?

We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus