Trending
MOST READ
Chris Pérez, Selena’s Husband, Faces His Past and Looks Forward, Musically

Chris Pérez, Selena’s Husband, Faces His Past and Looks Forward, Musically

Music: Chris Pérez never saw it coming. “All I ever wanted to do was play guitar,” he told the Current. “I never thought I’d be the subject of an interview... By Enrique Lopetegui 8/28/2013
Chris Perez, husband of slain Tejana icon Selena, tells of romance, suffering

Chris Perez, husband of slain Tejana icon Selena, tells of romance, suffering

Arts & Culture: In one of the final chapters of his book To Selena, With Love (out March 6), Selena's widower Chris Perez mentions that Abraham Quintanilla, his former father-in-law, once... By Enrique Lopetegui 3/7/2012
Failure Is Not an Option: George Lopez returns to SA

Failure Is Not an Option: George Lopez returns to SA

Arts & Culture: It is evident comedian George Lopez is still a little sensitive about the on-again, off-again relationship he’s had with television. Whatever the... By Kiko Martínez 10/22/2014
A Closer Look: The ins and outs of a few important races

A Closer Look: The ins and outs of a few important races

News: For more than a year now gubernatorial candidates Wendy Davis and Greg Abbott have dominated airwaves and secured way... By Mark Reagan 10/22/2014
Step Off: How Kacey Musgraves won Nashville

Step Off: How Kacey Musgraves won Nashville

Music: Though she was born in 1988 and released her first recordings at the age of 14, Texas native Kacey Musgraves has always... By James Courtney 10/22/2014
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

Recall: (Maybe) discovered: the 'God particle'

Photo: , License: N/A



Related stories


Judging by enthusiasm alone, the best movie of 2011 was the trailer for The Dark Knight Rises (12.5 million views in 24 hours, not too shabby). So it’s either reassuring or more troubling still to know that the biggest event in science, too, was a preview. In a scientific year characterized by glowing cats and the Nobel-winning discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe, it was a glimpse of that notorious fundamental particle, the Higgs boson, which had fanboys talking.

Finding evidence for the Higgs field, which theoretically condensed out of the Big Bang and gives mass to everything in the universe, was a big part of the reason Europe buried a big atomic donut, the Large Hadron Collider, under the French-Swiss border — science’s Bat Cave. Various experiments in that high-energy particle accelerator are designed to investigate the universe’s more esoteric quirks (and quarks): extra universes, antimatter, supersymmetry. By recreating the conditions of the universe immediately after the Big Bang, scientists hope to discover how this whole thing is nailed together.

The Higgs boson, or “God particle” as it’s known around the way, is important because it would prove the validity of the Standard Model Theory of particle physics that purports to explain how most of the universe fits together. If there’s no Higgs, it means that another convoluted theory must take its place. Glimpses of where the Higgs might be appeared this year, but it won’t be until 2012 that further experimentation proves more conclusively whether the Higgs exists, and whether it is really millionaire playboy Bruce Wayne.

We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus