Trending
MOST READ
Beaches Be Trippin\': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Beaches Be Trippin': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Arts & Culture: Let’s face it, most of us Lone Stars view the Texas coast as a poor man’s Waikiki. Hell, maybe just a poor man’s Panama Beach — only to be used... By Callie Enlow 7/10/2013
Newsmonger: Creative arguments on both sides of the VIA streetcar debate

Newsmonger: Creative arguments on both sides of the VIA streetcar debate

News: If a petition meant to derail a $280 million streetcar project in downtown San Antonio isn’t successful, two... By Mark Reagan 7/23/2014
7 Public Art Projects Worth Searching For

7 Public Art Projects Worth Searching For

Arts & Culture: You’re likely familiar with the high-profile works of public art on view around downtown San Antonio: the gigantic, red swoop of... By Sarah Fisch 7/23/2014

Best Public Swimming Pool

Best of 2013: 4/24/2013
New Sensation: SA’s Austin Mahone and teen pop superstardom

New Sensation: SA’s Austin Mahone and teen pop superstardom

Music: Like the bulk of Austin Mahone’s Instagram account, this one’s a selfie. In a white tank top, hair coifed up real big, Mahone arranges... By Matt Stieb 7/22/2014
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

2011 YEAR IN REVIEW

Recall: How Steve Jobs even changed Mexicans with Guns

Photo: , License: N/A



Related stories


“Let’s have a look,” Bono told the Chicago Tribune. “The ‘devil’ here is a bunch of creative minds, more creative than a lot of people in rock bands. The lead singer is Steve Jobs. These men helped design the most beautiful art object in music culture since the electric guitar. That’s the iPod. The job of art is to chase ugliness away.”

Steve Jobs obsessed more about stuff like the beauty of the computer’s power chord than business projections. Marketing and design, again, were his passions, but he had the soul of an artist. It was Jobs that delivered the now-legendary “Think Different” campaign. “We at Apple had forgotten who we were,” he told Isaacson. “One way to remember who you are is to remember who your heroes are.” The campaign, one of the most powerful in the history of advertising, featured black-and-white photographs of key historical figures (Chaplin, John and Yoko, Picasso, Miles, César Chávez, and many others) with the simple slogan, “Think Different.” Just a slogan and the Apple logo — even if there were questions about whether it was proper English.

“I never owned an iPod, iPad, iPhone, or any type of Apple computer,” Mexicans With Guns’ Ernest Gonzales defiantly wrote the Current. But even he was forced to reconsider, writing back minutes later: “But if the computer never became a household thing then there would be none of my music as I know it.”

At the upcoming 54th annual Grammy Awards in February, Jobs will be posthumously honored with a Trustees Award, one of the Special Merit Awards given every year by The Recording Academy to people who offer "a variety of brilliance, contributions, and lasting impressions on our culture" and who had "an indelible impact on our industry."

Few of us have not been touched by Jobs. But ultimately, his victory had nothing to do with computers or even the music industry. “This wasn’t about processor speed or memory,” he once said. “It was about creativity.”

He was damn right, and that’s why he changed not only one world, but several. In the process he changed us too by making beautiful and easy-to-use products allowing each of us to express ourselves more clearly.

We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus