Trending
MOST READ
Beaches Be Trippin\': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Beaches Be Trippin': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Arts & Culture: Let’s face it, most of us Lone Stars view the Texas coast as a poor man’s Waikiki. Hell, maybe just a poor man’s Panama Beach — only to be used... By Callie Enlow 7/10/2013
Best Hookah Bar

Best Hookah Bar

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013
Texas Law Leaves Abortion Out of Reach for Many Women

Texas Law Leaves Abortion Out of Reach for Many Women

News: Texas’ sweeping abortion law has already eliminated all abortion clinics south of San Antonio, and the last clinic west of the city... By Alexa Garcia-Ditta 8/27/2014
How Rebates Have the Texas Film Industry Playing Catch Up To its Neighbors

How Rebates Have the Texas Film Industry Playing Catch Up To its Neighbors

Screens: See if you can spot the common thread that is pulling at the seams of the Texas film industry. On NBC’s The Night Shift, a stock-written staff... By Matt Stieb 8/27/2014
Cityscrapes: A race to the convention floor

Cityscrapes: A race to the convention floor

News: “Conventions go to the city which exerts the greatest efforts to secure them. San Antonio can get any convention that it goes after.” That was the position... By Heywood Sanders 8/27/2014
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

Music

Sleigh Bells’ Alexis Krauss on Bloodshed, R&B and Sensory Overload

Photo: Courtesy photo, License: N/A

Courtesy photo

Sleigh Bells singer Alexis Krauss will traumatize herself for you


Noisy, bombastic power pop duo Sleigh Bells has been setting the world on fire with their highlighter-green flame of hot rock for the past half-decade or so. The band is currently on the second leg of its tour supporting Bitter Rivals, their third full-length, which dropped late last year. Over the phone, I got a chance to speak with singer Alexis Krauss about their evolving style, bleeding all over the stage due to pointy guitars and her love of R&B.

So this is the second leg of your tour, and I noticed you are doing a ton of festivals (Coachella, BUKU Festival, NXNE). Do you enjoy the festival circuit?

Yeah, but festivals used to really intimidate us because we weren’t really as confident a live band as we should have been, considering the scale of the festivals we were playing. For example, we played Coachella for the first time before the first record had even been released [nervous laughter], so it’s really nice to play them now at this point, because we’re really confident onstage and our live shows feel super tight to me. I love the idea of bringing our music to a big stage with an incredible sound system, because it really does the production justice.

Are you adding any extra players for the tour?

We added a live drummer. We’ve never played with a live drummer before. His name is Chris Maggio and he’s just a total machine, a beast of a drummer. It works, because he’s really able to lock into all the electronic production. Our really good friend and production manager Ryan Primack is playing guitar. He was actually Derek [Miller, Sleigh Bells’ guitarist]’s bandmate in Poison the Well, so they’ve known each other for years. They really work in rounding out our sound and making the live show sound as close to the record as possible.

You’re known for your bombastic, over-the-top shows and stage presence. Do you think it’s challenging to translate the live energy to recording?

The more comfortable we get on stage, the more comfortable we are playing a more “diverse” show. I think in the beginning, when we did Treats, it was about getting up on stage and powering through and banging people over the head, like a sensory overload; it’s just an explosion of sounds and lights and then it’s done. As time has progressed, we’ve become more comfortable being more vulnerable onstage; letting the show diversify and playing songs that maybe aren’t as bombastic as “Infinity Guitars” and “Crown on the Ground,” and having moments that are softer or quieter or more subtle. I think the live show is a really good reflection of where we are musically. Our music has become more melodic or more feminine at times, but then more abrasive at times. We’re just interested in incorporating all our influences and all of the things that we like as music lovers, first and foremost.

Some of my favorite songs on Bitter Rivals seem to be more R&B influenced. Does that stem from a more collaborative writing process between you and Derek?

Recently in Music
We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus