Trending
MOST READ
Best Brunch

Best Brunch

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013
Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy Disappear into ‘Eleanor Rigby’

Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy Disappear into ‘Eleanor Rigby’

Screens: “If you’re going to start, you might as well start big,” an ambitious person once said. Ned Benson must have been paying attention, because for his first... By Cameron Meier 9/17/2014

Best Tattoo Shop

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013

Best Fajitas

Best of SA 2012: We wracked our brains over this one. Fajitas are pretty much all the same, no? Kinda like huevos rancheros. Our mind then drifted to a certain middle sister's wedding rehearsal... 4/25/2012
The Different Types of Roommates You Might Encounter and How to Deal

The Different Types of Roommates You Might Encounter and How to Deal

College Guide 2013: If you’re going to be in a college dorm, a spacious apartment, a cramped shared bedroom or anywhere on a college campus for that matter, be prepared for your... By Mary Caithn Scott 8/20/2013
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

Aural Pleasure Review

Rage Against the Machine: 'Rage Against the Machine XX (20th Anniversary Edition)'

Photo: , License: N/A


In the first-ever public appearance by Rage Against the Machine (October 23, 1991, at Cal State Northridge), you see Brad Wilk in familiar no-holds-barred mode, a clumsy-fingered Tom Morello (if there can be such a thing), a nervous Tim Commerford on bass, and on the side of the stage, Zach de la Rocha not knowing where to put his hands, anxiously waiting for the band's instrumental intro to "Killing in the Name." When De la Rocha finally walks to the center of the stage, grabs the mic, and joins the others for "Take the Power Back," you begin to understand why RATM took the world by storm. This (and other) early shows can be seen in this must-have reissue of the band's seminal debut, which did the unthinkable: it took a radical leftist band that mixed rap and metal to the mainstream. The reissue comes in three formats, but the deluxe version is worth every penny: It includes the legendary demo of that first album (sold for $5 at the merch table during shows), full concerts (the 1991 Cal State one and 2010's Finsbury Park in the U.K.), and a bunch of videos. The music has aged so well you may even forgive them for suggesting Abimael Guzmán (the leader of Peru's Maoist Shining Path guerrillas) was a good guy (the terrific "Bombtrack" video). Sadly, every word Zach spits is still relevant today. So is the music.

★★★★★ (out of 5 stars)

Recently in Music
  • The Permanent Gangsta Status of Mobb Deep’s Prodigy Prodigy, better known to ’90s rap aficionados as the prodigious half of Queensbridge duo Mobb Deep, has made a successful career operating on... | 9/17/2014
  • Our Picks for the 31st Annual Jazz’SAlive Eddie Palmieri: 9:30pm Saturday. Jazz’SAlive has traditionally made sure to clear at least one headlining space for Latin jazz... | 9/17/2014
  • Loudon Wainwright Hasn’t Got the Blues (Yet) Emerging with his eponymous debut in 1970, singer/songwriter Loudon Wainwright III found himself lumped along with fellow post-Dylan folk-revivalists Leonard Cohen, Cat Stevens and Randy Newman. But where those contemporaries relied on abstract imagery or p | 9/17/2014
We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus