Trending
MOST READ
Beaches Be Trippin\': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Beaches Be Trippin': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Arts & Culture: Let’s face it, most of us Lone Stars view the Texas coast as a poor man’s Waikiki. Hell, maybe just a poor man’s Panama Beach — only to be used... By Callie Enlow 7/10/2013
Best Hookah Bar

Best Hookah Bar

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013
Texas Law Leaves Abortion Out of Reach for Many Women

Texas Law Leaves Abortion Out of Reach for Many Women

News: Texas’ sweeping abortion law has already eliminated all abortion clinics south of San Antonio, and the last clinic west of the city... By Alexa Garcia-Ditta 8/27/2014
Best Coffee Shop

Best Coffee Shop

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013
How Rebates Have the Texas Film Industry Playing Catch Up To its Neighbors

How Rebates Have the Texas Film Industry Playing Catch Up To its Neighbors

Screens: See if you can spot the common thread that is pulling at the seams of the Texas film industry. On NBC’s The Night Shift, a stock-written staff... By Matt Stieb 8/27/2014
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

Music

Passafire, the U.S.’ hottest reggae band (sorry, Snoop!), returns to SA

Photo: Courtesy photos, License: N/A

Courtesy photos

A noticeable lack of dreads among the heads of Passafire, Ted Bowne second from left

Photo: , License: N/A


Life is good for Savannah, Ga.’s Passafire. The four-piece reggae, dub and prog rock band’s fifth album (and first with Easy Star Records), Vines (2013), debuted at No. 1 on iTunes’ and Billboard’s reggae charts, the latter feat involving knocking Snoop Lion’s Reincarnated to the second spot. At the time of this writing, the album is 17th on iTunes and no longer on Billboard’s top 10, but guitarist/vocalist Ted Bowne is still enjoying the sweet smell of success.

“The coolest thing is that something so DIY could become so popular,” Bowne told the Current on the phone from his mother’s home in Salisbury, Md. “It was a very nice treat. We were hoping to repeat what we did with [2011’s] Start From Scratch [which peaked at No. 6 on Billboard’s reggae chart], and we did, I guess: You can’t get any better than number one.”

Start From Scratch, the only album not self-produced by the band, also marked the beginning of the band’s SA connection, as it was produced by the Butthole Surfers’ Paul Leary, who also mixed Vines after the band decided to go back to the roots and do it all themselves.

“We love Paul, but we needed to cut costs,” said Bowne. “We even financed the whole record ourselves, and we couldn’t be happier with the results.”

Vines, as well as the previous two albums starting with 2009’s Everyone on Everynight, were recorded at arguably the band’s favorite place on earth: Sonic Ranch Studios. Located in Tornillo, right next to El Paso, it is the world’s largest recording complex.

“We wanted good sound, good equipment and good engineers, and Sonic Ranch is the place for us,” said Bowne, who also recorded guitar and vocals at his home studio in Georgia. Even though he and bassist/vocalist Will Kubley had a more hands-on approach to the project, the album was a truly collaborative effort, and keyboardist/guitarist Mike DeGuzman and drummer Nick Kubley (Will’s brother) had considerable input. The result is one of the best-sounding Passafire albums, especially for Bowne.

“[Leary] did an amazing job mixing,” said Bowne. “When he was producing [Start From Scratch] … I sometimes used my own amplifier and sometimes what was in the studio. But [on Vines] you’ll hear my real tone, the actual settings I play with live.”

Better than any other Passafire album, Vines reflects the band’s strongest facet: an identity devoted to Jamaican grooves but not artificially confined by it.

“We play reggae but we don’t ever try to sound like something we’re not,” said Bowne. “I don’t try to sing with a Jamaican accent or adopt a foreign sound. We play reggae because it’s part of our collective musical consciousness, this is the music we grew up loving.”

Vines also sounds like a band expanding their sonic map, branching out and starting to incorporate forms of rock, folk and funk, without abandoning reggae but also staying away from a pseudo rasta image and sound.

Recently in Music
We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus