Trending
MOST READ
SAPD Issues Thousands of Tickets for Homelessness

SAPD Issues Thousands of Tickets for Homelessness

News: Data and records obtained by the Current show that between January 1, 2013, and early October of this year the San Antonio... By Alexa Garcia-Ditta and Elaine Wolff 10/22/2014
6 Sinfully Good Grilled Cheese Sandwiches in SA

6 Sinfully Good Grilled Cheese Sandwiches in SA

Food & Drink: Cheesy Jane’s. Multiple locations, cheesyjanes.com. If the name is any indicator, this San Antonio staple doesn’t mess around when it comes to... By Tommie Ethington 10/22/2014
Alamo Ice House Brings Hill Country to Downtown

Alamo Ice House Brings Hill Country to Downtown

Food & Drink: There was a special kind of draw at Alamo Ice House on a recent Tuesday evening. A handful of weeks after opening its... By Jessica Elizarraras 10/22/2014
A Closer Look: The ins and outs of a few important races

A Closer Look: The ins and outs of a few important races

News: For more than a year now gubernatorial candidates Wendy Davis and Greg Abbott have dominated airwaves and secured way... By Mark Reagan 10/22/2014
‘Walking the Camino’ Explores a Treacherous Trek Through Spain

‘Walking the Camino’ Explores a Treacherous Trek Through Spain

Screens: In the Middle Ages, pilgrims walked the 500-mile El Camino de Santiago de Compostela as a pilgrimage to the tomb of Apostle St. James. It was an... By Stephen James Ross 10/22/2014
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

Music

Mother Mother, one of the hottest bands from the Great White North

Photo: , License: N/A


While U.S.-based press on Mother Mother, who open for AWOLNATION at the White Rabbit March 9, might be slim, our neighbors to the north increasingly appreciate the band’s genre-bending rock. The Vancouver, B.C.-based fivesome’s latest album, The Sticks, and their previous effort, 2011’s Eureka, both charted in the top 20 for albums and top five for singles on Canada’s music charts and last year the band was nominated for Best New Group in Canada’s Music Awards, known as the Junos. Their live shows continually sell-out top venues across the country. So ubiquitous are they that the backlash has already begun among Canucks, with an Edmonton Journal columnist hilariously proclaiming, “If it wasn’t for Nickelback, Mother Mother might be the most hated band in Canada.”

But while Nickelback revels in its sonic sameness, Mother Mother ping pong from precious folk to jazz-inflected pop to moody rock anthems, often all in the span of one album. Songwriter Ryan Guldemond (guitar), his sister Molly (synth), and Jasmin Parkin (keys) provide the eerie harmonic vocals, which veer from affectless to full-throttle depending on the song. Jeremy Page offers a rather unusual combo of bass guitar and saxophone, and Ali Siadat nimbly holds Mother Mother’s disparate parts together on drums and layers in electronics. Three of the members met while in music school for jazz, and the learned obsession with precision and adaptability infuses every song. Beside Mother Mother’s instrumental smorgasbord, Guldemond is known for his biting lyrics. His wicked wordplay and je ne sais gofuckyourself are most present on The Sticks, released stateside last month. The concept album contemplates nothing short of complete societal collapse, which nicely dovetails with tourmates AWOLNATION’s worldview. 

On the first day of their tour, I spoke with drummer Ali Siadat about San Antonio’s prestigious designation as a mop-up tour stop and the drawbacks of onstage banter.

In Texas, you’re going through Lubbock, San Antonio, and Corpus Christie, but you’re skipping some of the bigger cities. Are you excited to see some of these markets?

Very much so. That’s part of the charm of the tour for us. We’re the openers for AWOLNATION, and often times these larger bands will play a lot of major markets on one tour and then they’ll mop-up, they’ll go where they have a large number of fans that aren’t necessarily in the bigger markets but who still really want to see them live.

You’re really popular in Canada, but it seems that in the U.S. there’s not as much of a focus on your band.

Yeah, it still feels like it’s the early growth stage here in the U.S. We have focused a lot on Canada, and being a Canadian band we have avenues to exposure in Canada in a very immediate way that are harder to come by in the U.S., especially when you don’t live there. The U.S. is a tough market to break, it’s a big market, there’s a lot of people, it’s all very spread out. The radio stations are very region specific and there’s a lot of regions. This tour is a huge step for us to really see areas that we’re not usually lucky enough to get around.

Recently in Music
  • The Otherworldly Appeal of Pure X’s ‘Angel’ Before we treat the music of Pure X’s third LP Angel, let’s take a moment to appreciate the airbrushed brilliance of its album art. On a... | 10/22/2014
  • The Infinite Blues of Woodstock Alums Canned Heat Thirty-two bands played the original Woodstock back in 1969. Of those 32, two are still at it today. And if you discount Santana on the grounds that he’s really more a guy than a band at this point, well, that just leaves Canned Heat. Half a century is a | 10/22/2014
  • Step Off: How Kacey Musgraves won Nashville Though she was born in 1988 and released her first recordings at the age of 14, Texas native Kacey Musgraves has always... | 10/22/2014
We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus