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Best Brunch

Best Brunch

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013
Italian: SoBro Pizza Co.

Italian: SoBro Pizza Co.

Flavor 2014: If you build it, they will come. If you build it underneath their apartments, they’ll stop by for gelato, Napolitano pizzas and an excellent wine... 7/29/2014
Dessert & Bakery: La Panaderia

Dessert & Bakery: La Panaderia

Flavor 2014: Los panaderos are in San Antonio. Brothers David and Jose Cacéres have opened the first of what could be many locations of La Panaderia, a concept the... 7/29/2014
Best Happy Hour

Best Happy Hour

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013
'The Queen of Versailles': How David Siegel ruined the world and then got screwed himself

'The Queen of Versailles': How David Siegel ruined the world and then got screwed himself

Screens & Tech: Lauren Greenfield won two documentary directorial awards at Sundance this year for her fascinating portrayal of David and Jaqueline Siegel, billionaires building the biggest... By Enrique Lopetegui 10/3/2012
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People: Critic's Pick

Best Inventor

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TIE: Ryan Beltrán, co-founder of Elequa
elequatech.com

Tim Jenison, founder of NewTek (pictured)
newtek.com

Elequa is a water purifying startup company that utilizes electrocoagulation, a simple, inexpensive, chemical-free process that kills bacteria and separates other water contaminants using an electric current. Beltrán, a go-getter who’s dabbled in photography, film, travel and activist causes like Occupy Wall Street, co-founded Elequa and is now working to bring affordable and clean water to families in Mexico.

Jack-of-all-trades Tim Jenison founded NewTek in 1986, which led to the development of many successful desktop video production and manipulation software. His most recent cinematic foray, the recently released Tim’s Vermeer, documented his painstaking process of recreating Johannes Vermeer’s The Music Lesson by using lenses, mirrors and a camera obscura in an attempt to prove Vermeer and his contemporaries may have used such technology to acheive their revered style.

People: Critic's Pick
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