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Arts & Culture

Nightmare on Grayson's final haunting

Photo: Photos by Josh Huskin, License: N/A

Photos by Josh Huskin

After Grayson closes, where will its monsters, demons, and killer clowns find new employment? We thought we'd hook some of them up with new jobs around the Pearl Brewery, but it didn't always go as planned ... as Yasminda Khorshidian found out when she got a haircut from Chuckles (Casey McColley) at Aveda Institute San Antonio.

Photo: , License: N/A

Clowntime is over: Jarome Barideaux (left) and Mike Kitchen working for the man at Sam's Burger Joint.

Photo: N/A, License: N/A

Carlos Montoya oversees new bike mechanic Punkin (Casey McColley) at Bike World Rentals.


Gordon Wise is talking to me, but all I can focus on are the knives. There are hatchets, daggers, and something resembling a DIY katana Japanese sword displayed just above his right shoulder on the black office wall behind him. I spy a small dusty animal skeleton of unknown species propped atop a bookcase. A dirty Michael Myers mask, some mysterious jarred goo, and a faded Atlas of Human Anatomy accompany the bones on the shelves.

I'm ogling a couple of demented Beethoven busts on the desk to my right and the gruesome scars on a Freddy Krueger mask to my left when Wise's voice pierces my trance. "There's nothing more satisfying than knowing you terrorized a 13-year old," he exclaims, emitting a big belly laugh. There's a mischievous twinkle in this big tattooed fellow's eye, and if the relentless screaming coming from down the hall later that evening proves anything, it's that Wise knows how to frighten San Antonians of all ages.

Fear is the business of Wise, director of operations at Nightmare on Grayson for 15 years. We're sitting in Nightmare headquarters, a crowded office housed in the same giant warehouse as the infamous haunted house. Tonight is Retro Night, a special treat for loyal fans interested in seeing the return of monsters of yore. Through a window to the break room on my right I watch a bloody werewolf drinking coffee.

Founded by Haunted House mogul Gene Braden in 1989, San Antonio's oldest haunted house has been a yearly Halloween pilgrimage for generations of fiends for fear. Based 100 percent on the merits of live actors in a hodge-podge of campy settings, the ever-evolving attraction has a loyal fan base, keeping business relatively consistent throughout the years.

Lines constantly pour down the sidewalk, the busiest night on record bringing 4,000 customers one evening in 2007. The popular haunted house and its dedicated staff have watched their neighborhood explode before their eyes in recent years, however, bringing soaring property values and gentrification. It's been enough to force management to make the difficult decision to close Nightmare on Grayson. This is the group's final year.

"You know, when we moved into this neighborhood in 1989 this was probably one of the worst neighborhoods in the city of San Antonio," says Wise. "It was deserted. There were prostitutes. There was graffiti. There was unkept property."

Considering themselves stewards of the neighborhood, Grayson employees took pride in their surroundings. "We moved in and started cleaning up the neighborhood. We would go around cutting grass at all these lots and sidewalks where the city wouldn't maintain it, where the owners wouldn't maintain their own property." Wise speaks proudly of his accomplishments. "I had a can of paint in my shop for every building down Grayson. For every color building. And we would paint over the graffiti every time we saw it the very next day."

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