Trending
MOST READ
Beaches Be Trippin\': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Beaches Be Trippin': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Arts & Culture: Let’s face it, most of us Lone Stars view the Texas coast as a poor man’s Waikiki. Hell, maybe just a poor man’s Panama Beach — only to be used... By Callie Enlow 7/10/2013
New Sensation: SA’s Austin Mahone and teen pop superstardom

New Sensation: SA’s Austin Mahone and teen pop superstardom

Music: Like the bulk of Austin Mahone’s Instagram account, this one’s a selfie. In a white tank top, hair coifed up real big, Mahone arranges his facial... By Matt Stieb 7/22/2014
Op-Ed: Don’t deny Ivy Taylor’s chance to ‘evolve’

Op-Ed: Don’t deny Ivy Taylor’s chance to ‘evolve’

News: The San Antonio City Council may gain a major accomplishment in the city’s already progressive history in race relations. When Julian Castro announced his... By Frederick Williams 7/2/2014
Free Things to Do: Kid-friendly

Free Things to Do: Kid-friendly

Free Guide: It’s almost summer, which means that your government-subsidized free daycare (aka public school) goes on hiatus thanks to an archaic allegiance to a rural agriculture economic system that hasn’t been in play for decades. What to do with the wee ones whining 5/21/2014

Best Romantic Restaurant

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

Arts & Culture

Luminous Impressions: Music cult masterworks of Henri Fantin-Latour

Photo: , License: N/A

Henri-Fantin Latour, Apotheosis


Ever heard of Storm Thorgerson? Probably not, but you've probably seen his work — it's hard to go a week without seeing a T-shirt, poster, or coffee mug featuring the iconic album cover of Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon. That simple yet intriguing image became the face of 1970's rock 'n' roll and will forever be associated with the diffraction of light. Capturing music in a visual medium is difficult, but artists like Thorgerson prove that it can be done, and done beautifully.

But our friend Storm was hardly the first to visually embody music: Henri Fantin-Latour was capturing the music scene in his lithographs nearly 150 years ago. The San Antonio Museum of Art is currently displaying over 40 of these works in the exhibition "Luminous Impressions," on view through April 7. Though the product of most of Fantin-Latour's career consisted of over 800 floral paintings, he considered his lithographs depicting music scenes to be his crowning achievements. In stark opposition to his paintings, out of 190 known lithographs only one is a floral print. The majority of the stunning pieces depict scenes from popular musical works of the 19th century: Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen and Berlioz's L'enfance du Christ, to name a few. Fantin-Latour's admiration for these composers washes over the viewer of "Verité," in which the personification of truth etches the names Schumann, Berlioz, Wagner, and Brahms onto a tablet held by fate.

With access to 140 of his lithographs, the exhibit offers patrons an unrivaled glimpse into the emotive work of this French artist. "Apotheosis" is an especially poignant example of the immortality Fantin-Latour grants his subjects. An ethereal woman shrouded in black holds a scroll listing musical compositions, while cherubs deck garlands on a wall bearing the simple inscription: Berlioz. The image pulls the viewer in with soft edges and deep shadows (characteristic of lithographs), lending gravitas to the scene and directing the viewer to feel a sense of awe as she reads the composer's name. Other equally exhilarating pieces were inspired by compositions, and SAMA has creatively included QR codes next to many of these enabling viewers to listen to the very music that inspired the artwork.

Fantin-Latour and Thorgerson, though separated by many decades, share a passion. For them, music is more than an auditory art: it affects us viscerally, coursing through our bodies like strong wine and creating grandiose visions.

Luminous impressions

$8-$3
Free 4-9pm Tuesdays
10am-9pm Tue, Fri, Sat
10am-5pm Wed, Thu
10am-6pm Sun
San Antonio Museum of Art
200 W Jones
(210) 978-8100
samuseum.org

Recently in Arts & Culture
We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus