Trending
MOST READ
Best Vietnamese Restaurant

Best Vietnamese Restaurant

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013

Best Spa

Best of 2013: 4/24/2013
2060: SA looks forward, protects drinking water

2060: SA looks forward, protects drinking water

News: In just 14 years, the City of San Antonio has purchased 125,712 conservation acres over the Edwards Aquifer... By Mark Reagan 9/17/2014
Lost Bar Nails Drunk Food, Sports Bar Vibe

Lost Bar Nails Drunk Food, Sports Bar Vibe

Food & Drink: Much like the cookie-cutter houses that fill the North Side, (most) bars outside of 1604, hell outside 410, tend to have... By Jessica Elizarraras 9/17/2014

Best Place to Get High in Public

Around Town: Critic's Pick: 4/23/2014
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

Flash Fiction

Best of Flash Fiction, February 2013

Photo: , License: N/A


We're all good at something (maybe I shouldn't be quite so casual or vague about that). Sometimes that something translates into another area, sometimes it doesn't. To get a bit more specific: chess is a game of foresight, but so is soccer. Players and pieces move around the field to their objective. It's all about focus. But then again no one ever broke a wrist playing chess. This story by Mo H Saidi, which was published last year in the collection The Garden of Milk and Wine put out by Rhyme & Reason, explores the role of games in several different ways. Read his story, Blue Box on the Current's blog. Send in your flash about sports: flashfiction@sacurrent.com

Playing Chess in the Mosque

by Mo H Saidi

"You don't need to invent an excuse," Mr. Zandi said, "your father told me it was okay for you to come with us."

I had joined the middle school sport teams to go to another city only as a member of the soccer team. Nobody had told my parents I was also the captain of our chess team. Mother would always say, "Chess is un-Islamic and frustrates a child's mind." And Father would nod. At home I couldn't play chess at all, so I would stay late at school to practice the game.

"Why are they against chess when it is such a great mental exercise?" Mr. Zandi, the PE teacher asked me.

"Because Yazid I, the second Umayyad Caliphate, who beheaded Hossein the third Imam of the Shiites, played chess."

I got to the soccer match thirty minutes late, because in preparation for the next chess match I had been practicing the King and Queen's gambits in one of the classrooms. However, when our chess team won four to nothing because the opponents failed to show up, we ended up playing two exhibition matches against ourselves. Since our school had lost the basketball match in the morning, the outcome of this soccer match would determine the overall winner.

The well-attended match began at two o'clock, and the game was scoreless at halftime. In the second half, we lost one player to injury. The coach shouted my name. I raised my hands several times but he didn't see me. Finally I ran to him. "What can I do, Coach?"

"We are a player short," he yelled, "the striker is injured, get ready fast."

I changed quickly and soon found myself dribbling the ball around the last defendant and moving it forward into the penalty box. Approaching the goal, I maneuvered around the goalie, and had almost passed him when he blocked my left foot. I still managed to kick the ball toward the net, confident the goal would be mine. However, I tripped over his legs, twisted my ankle, and fell sideways on my knee. Right away, my ankle swelled, turned tender and red. My entire leg became heavy with intense pain, and I felt dizzy. I was flat on my back and could not move my limbs. The first aid people carried me away on a stretcher.

When we passed the coach, I asked him, "Did the ball go in?" He laughed and turned his head side to side. "Thanks for the effort," he smiled.

"Did it?"

He nodded and said, "Barely." He looked at my swollen ankle and said, "Now you've got plenty of time to practice chess in your mosque."

Recently in Arts & Culture
We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus