Trending
MOST READ
Beaches Be Trippin\': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Beaches Be Trippin': Five Texas Coast Spots Worth the Drive

Arts & Culture: Let’s face it, most of us Lone Stars view the Texas coast as a poor man’s Waikiki. Hell, maybe just a poor man’s Panama Beach — only to be used... By Callie Enlow 7/10/2013
Free Will Astrology

Free Will Astrology

Astrology: ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the coming weeks it will be important for you to bestow blessings and disseminate gifts and dole out helpful... By Rob Brezsny 8/27/2014
Savage Love: Working Out the Kinks

Savage Love: Working Out the Kinks

Arts & Culture: My boyfriend of two years cannot climax or maintain an erection unless his testicles are handled, squeezed, pulled, or pressed on... By Dan Savage 8/27/2014
Best Hookah Bar

Best Hookah Bar

Best of SA 2013: 4/24/2013
How Rebates Have the Texas Film Industry Playing Catch Up To its Neighbors

How Rebates Have the Texas Film Industry Playing Catch Up To its Neighbors

Screens: See if you can spot the common thread that is pulling at the seams of the Texas film industry. On NBC’s The Night Shift, a stock-written staff... By Matt Stieb 8/27/2014
Calendar

Search hundreds of restaurants in our database.

Search hundreds of clubs in our database.

Follow us on Instagram @sacurrent

Print Email

ASK A MEXICAN

¡ASK A MEXICAN!

Photo: , License: N/A


Dear Mexican: What is the reason for the colors of the Mexican flag? Is there any razón it resembles the Italian flag, minus the águila y serpent? Conozco más mexicanos que estadounidenses pero none of mis 'manitos morenos seem to know why…
— El Girafe

Dear Male Giraffe Gabacho: Good for you for having Mexican friends AND learning Spanish to speak to them! And for having such cultured conversations instead of just whistling at hot chicas who pass by the workplace and talking trash on your kind! What's now the Mexican tricolor is technically older than the Italian tricolore — although Italian kingdoms had used red-white-green color schemes in their flags since the late 18th century, modern-day Italy really didn't form until the Kingdom of Italy in the 1860s, and it adopted the general design that still exists today in Italy's flag. Mexico's tricolor, on the other hand, dates back to shortly after the War of Independence for Spain and is based on the flag of the Army of the Three Guarantees, the unit led by Agustín de Iturbide, Mexico's first emperor; that flag was also red, white and green, although the stripes were diagonal instead of vertical. Reason for those color choices? Maybe Iturbide was a fan of Risorgimento, the movement that eventually unified all of Italy; maybe he wanted to confuse gabachos y Mexicans alike for centuries. Whatever the reason is, it's lost to history, like numerous Aztec codices and Salma Hayek's talent.

I cycle-commute daily and follow the rules of the road, which include riding with traffic, not against it. (Riding against traffic is a good way to hurt another cyclist or get one's self killed at an intersection.) Several times per week, I encounter (I don't want to say "run in to") characters who do this exactly backwards, riding against traffic and even making their right turns across lanes of traffic like normal people make their lefts. Invariably, they're either college students or Mexicans. Is this the normal way of riding a bike in Mexico? Do cyclists in Mexico more often find themselves becoming involuntary hood ornaments, or is this something that only happens on this side of the border?
— Thinking "Lucha Pollo" is not the Translation of "Chicken Figh
t"

Dear Gabacho: In 2004, the Center for Applied Research did a study for the Federal Highway Administration titled "The Pedestrian and Bicyclist Highway Safety Problem As It Relates to the Hispanic Population in the United States" that found a couple of interesting things. One stat was that Latinos were twice more likely to bike to work than gabachos; another was that "Hispanics and Blacks are over-represented in pedestrian crashes," with Latino deaths in bike crashes were 2.88 per 100,000 population, while the rate for gabachos were 1.78 per 100,000, and that a disproportionate amount of said deaths and accidents in general happened late at night, when most Mexi riders are returning or going to work. The report recommended educational outreach to Mexicans to correct the errors that you pointed out, but to say it's due to Mexican culture is false: negritos had a greater rate of death than Latinos, and while no hard stats exist for cycling deaths in Mexico, Mexico City is world-renowned for its great urban cycling environment. If you see Mexicans cycling wrong, it's probably because the urban streets don't allow for a proper environment (cycling with traffic is also dangerous). This is a teachable moment: get with them and advocate for designated lanes, bike-sharing programs, and amnesty for illegal immigrants.

Ask the Mexican at themexican@askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter @gustavoarellano, or ask him a video question at youtube.com/askamexicano!

Recently in Arts & Culture
We welcome user discussion on our site, under the following guidelines:

To comment you must first create a profile and sign-in with a verified DISQUS account or social network ID. Sign up here.

Comments in violation of the rules will be denied, and repeat violators will be banned. Please help police the community by flagging offensive comments for our moderators to review. By posting a comment, you agree to our full terms and conditions. Click here to read terms and conditions.
comments powered by Disqus