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Arts & Culture

Artist Megan Harrison on Creating a Crystal Cave in Southtown

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Photo: Courtesy photos, License: N/A

Courtesy photos

Images from Atramentite, drawing on top

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Photo: N/A, License: N/A


As we sat talking on the porch in front of Sala Diaz about her show Atramentite, Megan Harrison brought up early an important but little-discussed fact of visual art: works don’t often begin with specific or fully-realized concepts. Instead, artists get interested in a form, or a particular material. Then they combine it with other forms, materials and processes—some foreign, some they know—trying out many different possibilities. Through that process they find something interesting to explore further.

For Harrison, Atramentite began with one drawing. Hung to the right of the gallery’s entrance, the show’s lone drawing is an epic 5-by-10 feet, with its sharply projecting block forms represented through velvety black shadows, pale grays and bright areas. But as Harrison’s shadows and highlights create a sense of three-dimensional space, the same black and grey inks bleed and splatter across the drawing, emphasizing the work’s flat surface while also conveying depth.

“I was curious about how [the drawing] might actually evolve into three dimensions,” Harrison wrote me later, “and experimented with different ways to move these blocks from two to three dimensions.” As she pushed that idea further by degrees, trying out its possibilities for the show, Harrison’s drawing technique moved to the surfaces of five-sided crystalline rods in discrete and vitrine-encased sculptures elsewhere in the front room. In the left room, Harrison expanded the form into the viewer’s space, creating an installation of much larger rods pushing out of the gallery floor. That all three sets of work—drawing, sculptures and installation—carry the title Atramentite perhaps indicates that process: they are permutations of the same substance.

Where does the show’s title come from?

‘Atramentium’ is Latin for “dark, inky substance” and the suffix “-ite” refers to mineral and geological forms. To me it made sense to talk about these three-dimensional ink drawings as if they were natural forms, self-organizing mineral structures.

Can you tell me a little bit about your past, growing up, art school—whatever you think is relevant?

I grew up in Colorado where the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains meet. The experience of a place where the massive and expansive lie in dramatic contrast to one another has shaped my work. I explored the natural world often and had many open-ended days moving from one curiosity to the next. I didn’t start pursuing art formally until I was 25.

What aspects of the structure or formation of crystalline objects interest you?

It’s fascinating to me that the shape of a crystal is based on its smallest molecular bond. We can witness something invisible to us because the crystal’s structure amplifies the form of that initial and invisible bond, making the process visible to the human eye. The mineral specimens that I was looking at tend to be small but have a complexity of immense proportion. They were infinitely beautiful and mysterious no matter how long I looked at them or how much I studied their structure; this small thing that expanded like a universe.

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